Welcome to
Beaconhouse National University

B.Sc (Hons.) Economics

Program Overview

Areas: Economics, Micro and Macro Economics, Management, Accounting, Banking, Finance, Development, Trade, Econometrics, Financial Markets

Duration: 4 years, 8 semesters

Credits: 132

Career Paths: Banking and Financial Sector, Commerce and industry, Research organizations, Regulatory Bodies, Planning and Development Institutions, Non-Governmental Organizations

  • Program Description

    B.Sc (Hons) Economics is a comprehensive degree program that gives students an opportunity to enhance their personal and professional development in a highly supportive academic environment to enable them to play a leadership role in economic planning, development and management. Graduates of this program are provided with hands on experience on research, real world issues, and application of quantitative techniques while working on their research projects or thesis

  • Admission Requirement

    To be eligible for admission to B.Sc (Hons) Economics , a candidate must satisfy the following requirements: -

    • Educational Criteria
      • FA / F.Sc with at least 2nd division (i.e. 495 marks).
      • O-levels (in at least 6 subjects) and 3 A-levels. Advanced Subsidiary (AS) will not be taken into account.
      • High School Diploma and International Baccalaureate (IB) result with at least 2.5 CGPA
      • Equivalence certificate from IBCC for all international qualifications i.e. O-Levels/A-Levels, High School Diploma, International Baccalaureate etc.

      Students awaiting their FA/ F.Sc/A-Level results may apply for admission at BNU. Selected candidates will be granted provisional admission only, which may be regularized after they have been declared successful and meet the admission requirements of the university.

    • Written / aptitude test
    • Interview
  • Program Roadmap

    • Course Categories

      The BSc. (Honors) Economics program is divided into four different course categories as summarized below in Table 1. First, courses falling under the economics core category are the courses which every student expecting to graduate from the program must study. Second, students must choose courses worth a total of 33 credits from a variety of other courses offered by the Department of Economics to fulfill the economics elective requirement. Third, the non-economics core comprises a list of obligatory courses offered by departments other than economics. Lastly, students must study electives offered by departments other than the Department of Economics for a total of 18 credits. The distribution of credits across these four categories indicates the priorities of the program: a deep, broad and structured training in core areas of economics built on the foundation of a liberal arts training as embodied in the non-economics core, and the room to explore a variety of subjects within and beyond the confines of economics.

      The non-economics core (see Table 2 below) gives students an introduction to the study of politics, culture, history, anthropology, and history – a grounding for further exploration of a variety of disciplines offered by the university, both within and outside the liberal arts and social sciences. It also provides foundations in computing skills and academic writing and communication – skills which are necessary for students to be able to navigate their way through an undergraduate academic program today.

      The economics core (see Table 3 below) has multiple “faces”. The first face consists of two sequences with three courses each in mainstream economic theory (both micro and macro). These sequences are meant to equip students with the standard conceptual tools and language of the economics discipline and profession, so as to allow students to participate in contemporary global conversations and debates. This is the first learning outcome of the program. The second face focusses on political economy, and is made up of subject matter not typical of an economics core, especially the study of international political economy and the history of economic thought. This face forms a stark but necessary contrast to the mainstream theory courses of the first face, given the limitations of orthodox economic analysis. Courses from this part of the economics core will allow students to participate in conversations and debates not only on the margins of the economics discipline, but also to converse with critical voices within the mainstream. This is the second learning outcome of the program. It will also allow them to place Pakistan’s political economy in the context of the global political economy.

      The third face consists of training in mathematical, statistical, econometrics and research methods, and is complementary to both the first and second faces. Given the quantitative nature of the economics discipline today (whether in the mainstream or at the margins), these courses are meant to equip students with the tools of quantitative and empirical analysis which economics students today are expected to be familiar with. This is the third key learning outcome.

      Lastly, courses on issues of contemporary relevance complete the economics core.

      Table 1: Credit Requirements by Course Category

      Category Name Category Abbreviation Number of Credits Hrs.
      Economics Core EC 63
      Economics Electives EE 33
      Non-economics core NEC 18
      Non-economics electives NEE 18
        Total 132

      Table 2: Non-Economics Core (NEC)

      Course Title Credit Hours Course Code
      Academic Writing and Communication 3 DLA-110
      Islamic Studies 1.5 SLA-103
      Pakistan Studies: State, Society and Economy 1.5 SLA-102
      Introduction to Computing 3 CSC-102
      Introduction to World History 3 DLA-247
      Introduction to Social Anthropology 3 DLA-143
      Intro to Political Thought 3 DLA-109
        Total 18

      Table 3: Economics Core (EC)

      Course Code Course Title Credits Pre-requisites
      Mainstream Economic Theory
      ECO-103 Fundamentals of Microeconomics 3
      ECO-104 Fundamentals of Macroeconomics 3
      ECO-107 Microeconomics 1 3 Fundamentals of Microeconomics, Mathematics 1
      ECO-151 Macroeconomics 1 3 Fundamentals of Macroeconomics, Mathematics 1
      ECO-223 Microeconomics 2 3 Microeconomics 1
      ECO-225 Macroeconomics 2 3 Macroeconomics 1, Mathematical Economics
      Methods
      ECO-214 Econometrics 1 3 Mathematics 1, Statistics 2, Microeconomics 1, Macroeconomics 1
      ECO-207 Econometrics 2 3 Econometrics 1
      ECO-112 Mathematics 1 3
      ECO-201 Mathematics 2 3 Mathematics 1
      ECO-202 Statistics 1 3
      Statistics 2 3 Statistics 1
      Mathematical Economics 3 Mathematics 2
      Research Methods 3 Microeconomics 1, Macroeconomics 1, Econometrics 1
      Political Economy
      ECO-208 History of Economic Thought 3 Microeconomics 1, Macroeconomics 1, Statistics 1
      ECO-200 Development Economics 3 Microeconomics 1, Macroeconomics 1, Statistics 1
      International Political Economy 3 Microeconomics 1, Macroeconomics 1, Statistics 1, Introduction to Political Thought
      Current Issues in Pakistan’s Economy 3 Development Economics 1
      Topics of Contemporary Relevance
      ECO-260 International Trade 3 Microeconomics 1, Macroeconomics 1, Statistics 1
      ECO-323 Public Finance 3 Microeconomics 1, Macroeconomics 1, Statistics 1
      Code Monetary Economics 3 Macroeconomics 1, Microeconomics 1
      ECO-311 Environmental Economics 3 Microeconomics 1, Macroeconomics 1, Statistics 1
          Total 63
    • Degree Progression

      The degree progression or roadmap given below is not set in stone. It provides a working structure which allows for planning and predictability, and also provides flexibility to deal with change and contingency. It is expected that students will actively keep track of the progress of their degree and ensure that they are able to complete the degree requirements outlined above within the desired time-frame of 8 semesters. This will involve speaking regularly to faculty, carefully analyzing the course offerings every semester and choosing smartly from among the available courses.

    • Year I - Semester I

      Course Code Course Title Course Category Credit Hrs.
      DLA-109 Introduction to Political Thought NEC 3
      DLA-110 Academic Writing and Communication NEC 3
      SLA-102/103 Islamic Studies or Pakistan Studies NEC 1.5
      DLA-143 Introduction to Social Anthropology NEC 3
      ECO-112 Mathematics 1 EC 3
      ECO-103 Fundamentals of Microeconomics EC 3
        Total 16.5
    • Year I - Semester II

      Course Code Course Title Course Category Credit Hrs.
      ECO-201 Mathematics 2 EC 3
      ECO-104 Fundamentals of Macroeconomics EC 3
      SLA-102/103 Islamic Studies or Pakistan Studies NEC 1.5
      CSC-102 Intro to Computing NEC 3
      DLA-247 Intro to World History NEC 3
      ECO-107 Microeconomics 1 EC 3
        Total 16.5
    • Year II - Semester III

      Course Code Course Title Course Category Credit Hrs.
      Any non-economics elective NEE 3
      ECO-151 Macroeconomics I EC 3
      ECO-202 Statistics 1 EC 3
      Any non-economics elective NEE 3
      Any non-economics elective NEE 3
        Total 15
    • Year II - Semester IV

      Course Title Course Category Credit Hrs.
      Development Economics EC 3
      Mathematical Economics EC 3
      Statistics 1 EC 3
      Transnational Media and Pop Culture NEC 3
      NEE 3
        Total 15
    • Year III - Semester V

      Course Title Course Category Credit Hrs.
      Statistics 2 EC 3
      Econometrics 1 EC 3
      Current Issues in Pakistan’s Economy EC 3
      World Economic History EC 3
      International Political Economy EC 3
        Total 15
    • Year III - Semester VI

      Course Title Course Category Credit Hrs.
      Research methods EC 3
      Econometrics 2 EC 3
      Microeconomics 2 EC 3
      Macroeconomics 2 EC 3
      NEE/EE 3
        Total 15
    • Year IV - Semester VII

      Course Title Course Category Credit Hrs.
      International Trade EC 3
      Monetary Economics EC 3
      Financial Markets EC 3
      NEE/EE 3
      NEE/EE 3
        Total 15
    • Year IV - Semester VIII

      Course Title Course Category Credit Hrs.
      Public Finance EC 3
      Entrepreneurial Economics EC 3
      NEE/EE 3
      NEE/EE 3
      NEE/EE 3
        Total 15

      Note that in this semester the fall intake may take the thesis option instead of the two electives. So they would need to plan their studies accordingly.

  • Degree Requirement

    Students are required to complete 132 credit hours in order to complete the degree.